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Lenin Lives Next Door: Marriage, Martinis, and ...
9,95 € *
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You can't make this stuff up. So says American writer, imperial Russia enthusiast, and veteran expatriate, Jennifer Eremeeva, who has lived for the last 20 years in Russia with HRH, her Handsome Russian Husband (occasionally a.k.a. Horrible Russian Husband) and their growing daughter. Luckily for Eremeeva, she didn't need to make up most of the events that inspired this, her first work of fiction. When she (and her alter-ego heroine, coincidentally named Jennifer) quit her job to write full time, she became enthralled with the dingy gray building across the courtyard from her apartment, where, it turned out, Vladimir Lenin's embalmed corpse was routinely freshened up and preserved. The result is Lenin Lives Next Door: Marriage, Martinis, and Mayhem in Moscow. Based on Eremeeva's two decades in Russia, Lenin Lives Next Door knits together vignettes of cross-cultural and expatriate life with sharp observation, colorful historical background, and engaging humor. Each thematic chapter is an anecdotal exploration of an aspect of life in today's Russia, told with the help of a recurring cast of eccentric Russian and expat characters. Lenin Lives Next Door introduces listeners to Russians in their everyday milieu: at their dachas, in three-day traffic jams, and celebrating their 300-plus public and professional holidays with mayonnaise-based salads. Lenin Lives Next Door is an inside look at Russia by a recovering Russophile. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Jennifer Eremeeva. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/019725/bk_acx0_019725_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 24.11.2020
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Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir o...
9,95 € *
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A James Beard Award-winning writer captures life under the Red socialist banner in this wildly inventive, tragicomic memoir of feasts, famines, and three generations With startling beauty and sardonic wit, Anya von Bremzen tells an intimate yet epic story of life in that vanished empire known as the USSR - a place where every edible morsel was packed with emotional and political meaning. Born in 1963, in an era of bread shortages, Anya grew up in a communal Moscow apartment where 18 families shared one kitchen. She sang odes to Lenin, black-marketeered Juicy Fruit gum at school, watched her father brew moonshine, and, like most Soviet citizens, longed for a taste of the mythical West. It was a life by turns absurd, drab, naively joyous, melancholy - and ultimately intolerable to her anti-Soviet mother, Larisa. When Anya was 10, she and Larisa fled the political repression of Brezhnev-era Russia, arriving in Philadelphia with no winter coats and no right of return. Now Anya occupies two parallel food universes: one where she writes about four-star restaurants, the other where a taste of humble kolbasa transports her back to her scarlet-blazed socialist past. To bring that past to life, in its full flavor, both bitter and sweet, Anya and Larisa, embark on a journey unlike any other: they decide to eat and cook their way through every decade of the Soviet experience - turning Larisa’s kitchen into a "time machine and an incubator of memories". Together, mother and daughter re-create meals both modest and sumptuous, featuring a decadent fish pie from the pages of Chekhov, chanakhi (Stalin’s favorite Georgian stew), blini, and more. Through these meals, Anya tells the gripping story of three Soviet generations - masterfully capturing the strange mix of idealism, cynicism, longing, and terror that defined Soviet life. The stories unfold against the vast panorama of Soviet history: Lenin’s bloody grain requisitioning, 1. Language: English. Narrator: Kathleen Gati. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/rand/003631/bk_rand_003631_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 24.11.2020
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Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking
18,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Born in a surreal Moscow communal apartment where eighteen families shared one kitchen, Anya von Bremzen grew up singing odes to Lenin, black-marketeering Juicy Fruit gum at school, and longing for a taste of the mythical West. It was a life by turns absurd, drab, naively joyous, melancholy and, finally, intolerable. In 1974, when Anya was ten, she and her mother fled to the USA, with no winter coats and no right of return. These days, Anya is the doyenne of high-end food writing. And yet, the flavour of Soviet kolbasa, like Proust's madeleine, transports her back to that vanished Atlantis known as the USSR . In this sweeping, tragicomic memoir, Anya recreates seven decades of the Soviet experience through cooking and food, and reconstructs a moving family history spanning three generations. Her narrative is embedded in a larger historical epic: Lenin's bloody grain requisitioning, World War II starvation, Stalin's table manners, Khrushchev's kitchen debates, Gorbachev's disastrous anti-alcohol policies and the ultimate collapse of the USSR. And all of this is bound together by Anya's sardonic wit, passionate nostalgia and piercing observations. Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking is a book that stirs the soul as well as the senses.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 24.11.2020
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Everything is Wonderful
25,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

In 1993, Sigrid Rausing, a young student working on a PhD in Anthropology, went to spend a year living in Estonia, a remote Baltic State that had just gained independence from the recently collapsed Soviet Union. Armed with a notebook, rudimentary Estonian, and a clunky laptop, she arrived in the peninsula of Noarootsi, on Estonia's north-western tip, and made her way to the village of Purksi, the place that would be her home for the next twelve months. Purksi was the site of the Lenin Collective Farm, a now dilapidated reminder of the total control of the USSR had enjoyed just two years previously. In her year on the former collective farm, Rausing documented the lives of the ordinary people there--from Ruth, a Seventh Day Adventist who in 1952 saw a vision of Stalin lying in a grave and became intensely religious (Stalin died a year later), to Astrid, who once taught Rausing how to milk a cow and produced a feast of a dinner for her, to the cynical alcoholic Toivu and his wife Ina, who owned the apartment where Rausing rented a small room. Rausing's conversations with the locals touched on many subjects: the economic privations of post-Soviet existence, the bewildering influx of Western products, and the Swedish background of many of the locals, which was the focus of Rausing's anthropological study. Rausing was profoundly affected by the beauty and isolation of the forests, the rocky coastline that marked the border with the West and was off limits during the Soviet period, and the trials of a people who enjoyed just nineteen years of independence in four centuries. In Everything Is Wonderful, she reflects in impressive prose upon her time in a country that for the first time was beginning to carve out its own place in a new, post-Soviet Europe.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 24.11.2020
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Everything is Wonderful
18,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

In 1993, Sigrid Rausing, a young student working on a PhD in Anthropology, went to spend a year living in Estonia, a remote Baltic State that had just gained independence from the recently collapsed Soviet Union. Armed with a notebook, rudimentary Estonian, and a clunky laptop, she arrived in the peninsula of Noarootsi, on Estonia's north-western tip, and made her way to the village of Purksi, the place that would be her home for the next twelve months. Purksi was the site of the Lenin Collective Farm, a now dilapidated reminder of the total control of the USSR had enjoyed just two years previously. In her year on the former collective farm, Rausing documented the lives of the ordinary people there--from Ruth, a Seventh Day Adventist who in 1952 saw a vision of Stalin lying in a grave and became intensely religious (Stalin died a year later), to Astrid, who once taught Rausing how to milk a cow and produced a feast of a dinner for her, to the cynical alcoholic Toivu and his wife Ina, who owned the apartment where Rausing rented a small room. Rausing's conversations with the locals touched on many subjects: the economic privations of post-Soviet existence, the bewildering influx of Western products, and the Swedish background of many of the locals, which was the focus of Rausing's anthropological study. Rausing was profoundly affected by the beauty and isolation of the forests, the rocky coastline that marked the border with the West and was off limits during the Soviet period, and the trials of a people who enjoyed just nineteen years of independence in four centuries. In Everything Is Wonderful, she reflects in impressive prose upon her time in a country that for the first time was beginning to carve out its own place in a new, post-Soviet Europe.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 24.11.2020
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